Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

2 of 32

Artichokes

Packed with prebiotic fiber, artichokes can help promote the health and growth of your body’s probiotics, the good bacteria found in your GI tract. Probiotics are linked to loads of health benefits, from helping reduce your risk of chronic disease to even helping stave off a cold.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

3 of 32

Acorn Squash

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

4 of 32

Beets

Betalain, the compound found in beets, is linked to a wealth of health-promoting benefits, including reduced risk of cognitive decline, improved immunity, and protection from cellular damage that can lead to chronic disease down the line.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

6 of 32

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts also count as nutritional powerhouses thanks to those powerful glucosinolates, compounds linked to lowering cancer risk by protecting your cells from harmful DNA damage.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

7 of 32

Butternut Squash

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

8 of 32

Carrots

Some studies have shown that eating carrots may reduce the risk of gastric cancer by 26%. Of course, their reputation for boosting your eyesight is rooted in truth: Just one large carrot provides more than double your daily value of vitamin A, the nutrient that protects your ocular health.

RELATED: Why You Should Eat Carrots Every Single Day

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

9 of 32

Cabbage

Fiber, antioxidants, and the transformative ability to become kimchi with just a little fermentation?! We’re sold. In fact, sauerkraut (also made from cabbage) can help boost your body’s own probiotics and improve GI health, keeping you more regular.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

10 of 32

Cauliflower

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

11 of 32

Celery Root

Whether you use celery roots (also called celeriac) sliced in crunchy salads or blended into hearty soups, a cup will provide 20% of your daily vitamin C, plus a dose of cognition-boosting vitamin B-6 for only 60 calories.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

12 of 32

Cranberries

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

13 of 32

Fennel

Fennel is filled with folate, a type of B vitamin that helps with muscle and nerve function, as well as allowing you to reap the energizing benefits from the all the foods you eat.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

14 of 32

Grapefruit

Antioxidants galore! Citrus fruits come into season in late fall, so stock up on these nutritional powerhouses when they’re super fresh. Grapefruits come packed with fiber, water, and immune-boosting antioxidants that help reduce your risk of chronic disease.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

16 of 32

Kohlrabi

You heard it here first: Kohlrabi in 2019 will be what cauliflower was to 2018. Also called German turnip, it’s a nutrient-packed relative of wild cabbage that’s super low in calories, making it an easy way to add more veggies into rice dishes.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

17 of 32

Leeks

Branch out from your usual onions and garlic and use these versatile stems when cooking chicken or eggs to nab more vitamins A, C, and B-6. Just one stalk contains 29% of your daily value of vitamin A, which plays a critical part in maintaining the health of your heart, kidneys, lungs, and other organs.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

18 of 32

Mushrooms

Mild buttons, meaty portobellos, flavorful shiitakes: The diversity of edible fungi lends itself to tons of different dishes, but all of these toadstools pack in potassium and selenium, an essential nutrient that helps with DNA synthesis and hormone metabolism.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

19 of 32

Parsnips

Think of these as a slightly less starchy potato, helping you fill up on fiber, vitamins, and minerals, plus loads of antioxidants. Mix ’em up with carrots and roast in the oven for parsnip fries, a fun way to play with fall food!

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

20 of 32

Peanuts

A ¼ cup serving packs up to 9 grams of protein, 4 grams of fiber, and a unique profile of antioxidants that helps to improve oxygen flow throughout your body, regulating blood pressure, improving heart health, and reducing risk of chronic disease.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

22 of 32

Pecans

Pecans provide phytonutrients, plant-based compounds with powerful antioxidant benefits. Plus, they’re a good source of the mineral zinc, a crucial nutrient for your immune system. Research has linked diets high in zinc with a reduced risk of a whole host of diseases — particularly those related to age and lifestyle.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

23 of 32

Persimmons

Native to China, persimmons grow on trees but they’re technically classified as berries. The sweet orange flesh is a sneaky source of plant-based calcium. They also deliver loads of polyphenolic compounds, which lower your chance of heart disease.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

24 of 32

Pumpkin

Your favorite fall décor also doubles as a nutrient powerhouse too. Just one cup of canned pumpkin provides about 7 grams of fiber (about 20% of the recommended daily amount!), whereas kale has a little less than 3 grams. While both have a place on your plate, the fiber content of pumpkin fills you up and helps stabilize blood sugar, keeping your energy up throughout the day.

RELATED: 43 Sweet and Savory Pumpkin Recipes to Get You Pumped for Fall

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

25 of 32

Russet Potatoes

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

28 of 32

Spaghetti Squash

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

29 of 32

Sweet Potatoes

Not only are sweet potatoes high in vitamin A, but they’re a great source of vitamin B6, potassium, and magnesium as well. Vitamin B6 is an essential component for a variety of functions, such as metabolism, cognitive development, immune function, and circulation. Both potassium and magnesium play a part in regulating blood pressure as well as heart and bone health.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

30 of 32

Turnips

You might usually think of citrus fruit as a good source of vitamin C, but don’t discount turnips. One medium-sized root provides 42% of your recommended daily amount, and don’t forget about the greens. Eat the leafy tops in salads and other veggie dishes for a hefty dose of vitamins A, C, and B-6 as well as calcium and magnesium.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/health/diet-nutrition/g23620891/healthy-fall-foods/

P.S We are always on the the lookout for lifestyle solutions for our readers! If you are interested in safely detoxing, cleansing, and/or losing weight Visit Here for more information ALSO Get Our FREE Natural Cures Ebook Enter Your info Here slimladyteahttps://blog.slimladytea.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/30-healthy-fall-superfoods-according-to-a-nutritionist-1024x513.jpghttps://blog.slimladytea.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/30-healthy-fall-superfoods-according-to-a-nutritionist-150x150.jpgblogslimladyHealth & Wellnessbelly fat,cleanse,detox,lose belly fat,lose weight,weight lossAdvertisement - Continue Reading Below 2 of 32 Artichokes Packed with prebiotic fiber, artichokes can help promote the health and growth of your body’s probiotics, the good bacteria found in your GI tract. Probiotics are linked to loads of health benefits,...Entertainment, Wellness, And More.....